This was my 6th or 7th Lotusphere, and it may have been the best. The only one I’d would rank in the same category was the Superhuman software Sphere. Notes was on the web, and Dennis Leary commercials were running. Those were heady days and the boom was on. By comparison, today sees software as a commodity, the boom is long gone, and IBM’s direction has been less than clear over the last few years. The first hint I had that IBM/Lotus might be back on the right track was in the last months leading up to Sphere 2004.

2 thoughts on “

  1. I can’t wait to hear it! It’s been a while since there was real excitement around collaborative computing and it seems we are still suck in the mud emailing files back and forth wondering which version is the “right one”.

    Thanks outlook/exchange for talking the talk and delaying progress on collaborative computing for half a decade. Thanks alot!

    Mike

  2. John Vaughan’s written an article in SearchDomino that shares other’s impressions with more detail: http://searchdomino.techtarget.com/originalContent/0,289142,sid4_gci1050681,00.html?track=NL-201&ad=503414.

    In particular Mike, I think you’ll be interested by Andrew’s comments about end-user customization of the environment.

    The big unanswered question in my mind right now is how important we will be as smaller partner organizations and ISVs focused on individual users or departments within an overall massive rollout.

    If IBM fails to provide end users with a way to install tools and utilities into their Workplace Client, which run in addition to the centrally provisioned software, ISVs will have a very hard time, because every tool or utility must then be sold at the very top of the chain and rolled down to each client.

    At its surface, this would seem to be a boon for those who manage massive user environments. In reality, as a strategy it fails to consider that end users find local customization critical to the willing adoption of a new platform. Niche tools created by smaller vendors often meet end user needs that are ignored by centrally provisioned software.

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